Nagasaki and Fukushima survivors interlaced with experts link nuclear weapons and nuclear power. A wake up call!

"This film is not only very powerful but imperative viewing for the younger generations that have no concept of what 'nuclear' means."

Dr. Helen Caldicott, Founding President, Physcians for Social Responsibility
Synopsis: 

Moving, unforgettable living witnesses who survived two of the world's most momentous radiation crises: Nagasaki in 1945 and Fukushima in 2011.

They are interlaced with nuclear experts and archival footage, some shocking, illuminating the largely unrecognized connection between nuclear weapons and nuclear power, and the growing global movements to abolish both.

The documentary is both a tragic and an inspirational example of courageous women in the face of environmental catastrophes and an alert to everyone today about the dangers of continued nuclear proliferation and nuclear power.

Reviews

"...a compact, emotional documentary... Recommended."

C. Cassidy, Video Librarian

"...a stunning achievement!... nourishes our deepest hopes... may this jewel of a film be seen in every classroom and council chamber."

Joanne Macy, Author, "Active Hope: How to Face the Mess We're in Without Going Crazy"

"...powerful documentary…a brilliant job…"

Randy Rydell, Senior Political Affairs Officer, Office for Disarmament Affairs, United Nations

"...reminds us of what we need to accomplish if we are not to repeat [history]."

M. V. Ramana, Nuclear Futures Laboratory and the Program on Science and Global Security, Princeton University

"...profoundly effective... wonderful resource for educators... lessons that must not be lost... contemporary relevance... powerful..."

Dr. Rebecca E. Johnson, Executive Director, Acronym Institute for Disarmament Diplomacy

"...powerful look at the dangers of nuclear weapons and nuclear energy... compelling, informative film."

Chris Boeckmann, True/False Film Festival
Director's Commentary: 

The Fukushia-Daichi disaster began March 11, 2011.  The area in Japan with one of the worst nuclear meldowns in history, is still sending out rasiation that has been found across the Pacific to California and Oregon.  Students and teachers--and the rest of us--should know and talk about what happened and what chould happen to prevent future nuclear tragedies.