Sex is life. As death approaches, sex and creativity take on new meaning.

This film is a remarkable tribute to one man and to the entire life force. It is remarkable for its information -- and the sheer intimacy that resonates throughout the story. Should be required viewing for every human being -- let alone every student of human services.

Jorja Leap, Professor
 School of Public Affairs, UCLA
Synopsis: 

After mourning the loss of his wife of fifty years, Bill Cane, a 95-year-old singer/songwriter and music teacher, put an ad in the personals and went ballroom dancing in search of a new companion. He soon embraced a revitalized life full of romance, sex and music. Bill experienced a resurgence of creative energy and started writing and performing songs again; he compiled two CDs and set up an MP3 web site. Through interviews with Bill and women he dated, this film captures candid reflections on Bill's determination to keep love and sex in his life. Eager for Your Kisses documents a coming trend for the future -- people living vital, healthy lives, even in the bedroom, well into their old age.

Reviews

My students believe that sexual desire and activity end at the ripe old age of 50. Seeing a 95-year-old man eager to express his sexuality, create music, and savor every moment has forced them to examine their ageist biases about older adults and sexual expression. They'll never look at their grandparents or clients in the same way again. "Eager for Your Kisses" is a must-see for young people of every age!

Karen Lee, 
Professor of Social Welfare, UCLA

'Eager for Your Kisses' defies stereotypes as 95-year-old Bill Cane sings and dances his way into the hearts (and bedrooms) of the women in his life.

Alexander Payne, Filmmaker, “Nebraska,” "The Descendants," "Sideways"

A warm, vital, and whimsical portrait of Bill Cane, a nonagenarian bon vivant who refuses to get out of the fast lane. His myth-busting outlook on sex, aging, and creativity is living proof that dreams have no expiration date. 

Billy Frolick, Writer
 "Madagascar," 
"What I Really Want To Do Is Direct"

This welcome documentary forces us to re-think deeply ingrained societal stereotypes about sex and the elderly. It is warm, compelling and honest, and everyone who works with older people or simply thinks about getting old some day should watch it.

Ted Benjamin, Ph.D.
 Professor of Social Welfare, UCLA