A young doctor in the South Bronx embarks on a project to find out why African-American women are becoming infected with HIV at alarming rates. She finds a dangerous power imbalance that all heterosexual women face in the bedroom, but rarely discuss. Selected as Showtime’s 2008 World AIDS Day Film.

“This powerful, conceptually sure film is a model of documentary method and compassionate social filmmaking…a striking feminist inquiry."

Nathan Lee, The New York Times
Synopsis: 

A young doctor in the South Bronx embarks on a project to find out why African-American women are becoming infected with HIV at alarming rates. Dr. Mehret Mandefro takes us into the lives and relationship histories of her patients to find out what social factors are putting them at risk. When she expands her research to include women across boundaries of race, class and country, she discovers a dangerous power imbalance that all heterosexual women face in the bedroom, but rarely discuss. All of Us is about HIV/AIDS but it is not a tragedy. It is a story of resilience, courage and activism. Selected as Showtime’s 2008 World AIDS Day Film. 

Reviews

"Prepare to be surprised and enlightened… All of Us is a stark eye-opener on an awkward topic that happens to be a matter of life and death."

Martin Tsai, The New York Sun

"A riveting, documentary…the women who share their stories in All of Us are incredibly brave and have spoken out so that what happened to them doesn't happen to others.”

Melissa Silverstein, Huffington Post
Director's Commentary: 

I met Dr. Mehret Mandefro in 2003 when we were both Fulbright Scholars in London. We were both deeply committed to social change — she as a doctor, and I as a filmmaker — and wanted to know more about why African-American women were being disproportionately impacted by HIV. Unlike the AIDS movement of the 1980’s, largely spearheaded by gay men, there has been no such movement on behalf of the countless African-American women who have suffered disproportionately from this disease. Black women are 23 times more likely than white women to become HIV positive and HIV is still one of the leading causes of death for black women ages 18-35. All Of Us turns a spotlight onto this unacceptable reality.