Before moving to California in 2004, he made programs for the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum documenting the creation of new artwork by internationally renowned artists-in-residence. He has taught production and editing workshops for young people and adults and completed an MFA in filmmaking at the Massachusetts College of Art in conjunction with the completion of his  film, Father's Day. He has been an active member of New Day Films since 1981.

Films by Mark Lipman

Streets of Dreams

Streets of Dreams presents inspiring portraits of grassroots activists in communities of color who are using a community land trust to preserve affordable housing and promote development without the displacement of longtime residents.

Arc of Justice

Arc of Justice traces the remarkable journey of New Communities, Inc. and the struggle for racial justice and economic empowerment among African Americans in southwest Georgia.

NCI was created in 1969 by leaders of the Civil Rights Movement in Albany, Georgia to help secure economic independence for African American families.  For fifteen years, NCI cooperatively farmed nearly 6000 acres of land despite racist attacks and refusals by federal agencies to provide grants or loans. Its land was lost to foreclosure in 1985, but 25 years later NCI was given new life as a result of a successful class action lawsuit brought by hundreds of African American farmers against the U.S. Department of Agriculture. 

States of Grace

Winner of multiple audience awards, States of Grace intimately captures the profound transformation of a revered physician and her family in the wake of a life-changing accident.

Finding Our Way

What do men really want sexually? How did they learn about sex? How does sexual expression change with age? Finding Our Way explores these questions and offers a rare glimpse into men's experience of their sexuality as it follows the discussions of ten men who meet at a weekend retreat. 

Gaining Ground: Building Community on Dudley Street

Foreclosures. Unemployment. Childhood poverty. All these problems have hit American cities hard since the Great Recession. Gaining Ground, a follow-up to the award-winning documentary Holding Ground (1996), shows how one diverse Boston neighborhood has stemmed the tide against enormous odds.

Holding Ground: The Rebirth of Dudley Street

Holding Ground is at once a cautionary tale of urban policies gone wrong and a message of hope for all American cities. In 1985, African-American, Latino, Cape Verdean, and European-American residents in Roxbury, MA united to revitalize their community. 

To Have And To Hold

To Have and to Hold was the first documentary to examine the problem of wife abuse through the man's experience of it. Composed primarily of interviews with men who have assaulted their wives and lovers, this classic film explores the personal and societal attitudes which lead men to do violence to those nearest them. 

Embracing Our Sexuality

Embracing Our Sexuality is a fascinating look into the conversations of nine women who gather together for a weekend to talk about sex. The women range in age from 21 to 71 and come from diverse racial backgrounds and sexual orientations. In this intimate video produced, directed and recorded by women, we see the openness and warmth which evolves as the women share their questions, experiences and concerns. The women talk frankly about sexual orientation, menstruation, masturbation, sexual fantasies, orgasms and the effect of AIDS and sexual abuse on their lives. Both serious and humorous, the wide range of experiences offers a unique opportunity for all viewers--women and men--to talk about their sexuality. Note: See companion video Finding Our Way

Father's Day

Filmmaker Mark Lipman looks back at the impact of his father's death over thirty years ago and uncovers more than he bargained for. What begins as a personal memorial to his father evolves into a moving exploration of grief and depression, the vagaries of memory and the veneer of family normalcy.