Their films include HOME TO TIBET, about a Tibetan refugee's return to his homeland; BRIDGE OF FIRE, about two potters, one a Japanese and the other a fellow Vermonter, which was shown at the Museum of Modern Art and won the award for Best Media Work at The Montréal Festival of Films on Art, and a Cine Golden Eagle; WOLF KAHN: LANDSCAPE PAINTER, which won a Cine Golden Eagle; and THE WORLD IN CLAIRE'S CLASSROOM, about a veteran Vermont public school teacher's extraordinary vision of teaching children to appreciate diversity and to respect themselves and others. Their most recent documentary, TAKING ROOT: THE VISION OF WANGARI MAATHAI, became part of the New Day Collection in 2008. TAKING ROOT aired nationally on Independent Lens. It won the Audience Award at Hot Docs Canadian International Documentary Festival in Toronto and the Amnesty International Human Rights Award at the Durban, South Africa, Film Festival as well as many other awards. 

Films by Lisa Merton

BURNED: Are Trees the New Coal?

BURNED tells the little-known story of the accelerating destruction of our forests for fuel, and probes the policy loopholes, huge subsidies, and blatant green washing of the burgeoning biomass power industry. Forest activists, ecologists, and concerned citizens fight to protect the forests and their communities, and debunk this false solution to climate change.

 

Taking Root: The Vision of Wangari Maathai

TAKING ROOT tells the dramatic story of Kenyan Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Wangari Maathai whose simple act of planting trees grew into a nationwide movement to safeguard the environment, protect human rights, and defend democracy—a movement for which this charismatic woman became an iconic inspiration.

Home to Tibet

HOME TO TIBET documents the return of the Tibetan stone mason, Sonam Lama, to his homeland for the first time since his escape 12 years earlier. 

The World in Claire's Classroom

THE WORLD IN CLAIRE'S CLASSROOM documents a veteran public school teacher's extraordinary vision of teaching children how to appreciate diversity, how to respect themselves and others, and how to work together. Beginning with what the children know, Claire Olgesby moves gently with the students to discover the riches of a different culture. The film captures a genuine, unselfconscious learning experience.